10837 SE HAPPY VALLEY DR Happy Valley, OR 97086

Single Family Home for sale in Happy Valley, OR for $529,000 with 4 bedrooms and 3 full baths. This 3,037 square foot home was built in 1997 on a lot size of 0.1400 Acre(s). Property Information $529,000 4 Bedrooms 3 Full Baths Single Family 3,037 Square Feet Taxes are $6,185 Traditional Active 2 Floors Lot size of 0.1400 Acre(s) Built in 1997 Happy Valley, OR Rock Creek Neighborhood Clackamas County MLS/Web ID is 17219033 Just Listed Live happy in Happy Valley! This 4 bedroom home has nothing but views in front & green space and creek behind it. A princess walk overlooks the grand entry. Formal living & dining areas or great room with casual family room, dining area & kitchen to gather with your family. Vaulted master suite with dual vanities & relaxing jet tub. Large flex space upstairs would make a great playroom, media or craft room! Refinished hardwood floors! Bedroom (12 x 12) Bedroom (13 x 13) Bedroom (13 x 10) Bonus Room (24 x 13) Den (12 x 12) Dining Room (13 x 11) Family Room (17 x 12) Kitchen (15 x 12) Living Room (14 x 11) Master Bedroom (16 x 17) † Excluded Feature Get the facts about Happy Valley, OR! Population 18,611 Population Growth (since 2000) 91 % Median Income $89,531 Median Age 38.88 Households w/ Children 42 % Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. The content relating to real estate for sale on this web site comes in part from the IDX program of the RMLS™ of Portland, Oregon. Real Estate listings held by brokerage firms (licensees) other than Weichert Realtors are marked with the RMLS™ logo, and detailed information about these properties includes the names of the listing brokers. Listing content is copyright © 2015 RMLS™, Portland, Oregon. The information being provided is for consumers’ personal, non-commercial use and may not be reproduced or redistribute. Its sole purpose is to be used for no other purpose than to identify prospective properties consumers may be interested in purchasing and the data is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed accurate by RMLS™, Portland, Oregon. Data is updated as of 8/11/2017 08/10/2017 07:16 PM UTC. Some properties which appear for sale on this web site may subsequently have sold or may no longer be available. Financial calculator disclaimer: Default based on a 30-year fixed rate of 4.125% with 20% down. The estimated payment is …

Penn State High-Powered Offense Evokes Memories of 1994, Builds New Excitement

Trace McSorely and Saquon Barkley (Getty Images) CHICAGO — The best way to quantify the excitement around the Penn State football program heading into the 2017 season also is the simplest. James Franklin doesn’t want to get in trouble, but the fourth-year coach can measure the side effects of last year’s 11-3 this season — which earned his team a Big Ten championship and Rose Bowl berth — like this: “The best example is we’ve broken every record in season ticket sales this season,” Franklin said at Big Ten Media Days on Tuesday. “I wouldn’t be shocked by an average of 104,000 for the season.” MORE: Harbaugh expects more from Michigan Happy Valley is here again, and Penn State is on the short list of top playoff contenders. The Nittany Lions have two Heisman Trophy contenders in running back Saquon Barkley and quarterback Trace McSorley. Tight end Mike Gesicki stayed in school and offensive coordinator Joe Moorhead will be looking to improve after averaging 37.6 points per game in 2016. Franklin hears the stories about the legendary Penn State teams all the time, and the easiest A-to-B comparison is 1994. The quartet of quarterback Kerry Collins, running back Ki-Jana Carter, wide receiver Bobby Engram and tight end Kyle Brady helped Penn State win the Rose Bowl while averaging 47 points per game. Gesicki remembers Carter speaking to the team before the Rose Bowl against USC. He was grateful for the opportunity to listen to him speak. But this is a different Penn State team, in a different time — the right time in the four-team playoff era. The 1994 team finished No. 2 in the AP Poll behind Nebraska. This year’s team, which was stiffed out of the playoff last year, seemingly would get that opportunity to make the playoff if they deliver on expectations. That made bypassing the NFL Draft easy for Gesicki, who made that decision before the Rose Bowl. “I didn’t want that game to impact my decision, even if I had 10 catches for 200 yards and three (touchdowns) that wasn’t going to influence my decision,” Gesicki said. “I knew with the talent we had coming back what we were capable of achieving.” Gesicki alternates between calling his teammates by their first name and numbers to emphasize how good those star players are. He power cleans 380 pounds, but “26 is up there with 405.” Gesicki …

Zac Purton Takes the Honours with a Treble at Happy Valley’s Season Finale

Southern Legend races storms late to win the last race of the season at Happy Valley on Wednesday night in front of a big crowd of 24,794. Photos: Kenneth Chan Zac Purton stole the show with a winning treble at a Happy Valley season finale on Wednesday night for the absent and the absent at heart. Caspar Fownes was “the absent” as the Valley king has already commenced the summer break with his family overseas but it didn’t stop him landing a winning double with Imperial Seal (Purton) and Southern Legend (Karis Teetan). David Hall was the absent at heart, signing off before this Sunday’s last bow at Sha Tin as he prepares to be married in Australia in the coming weeks, but bidding farewell with a double of his own as 101-1 chance Flying Quest (Chad Schofield) stunned punters in race six before the strongly fancied Dr Listening (Purton) made up for his unlucky last start defeat 30 minutes later. Purton, who also scored on Starlight for Dennis Yip Chor-hong to make up his three, went out of his way to massage Dr Listening to the front, no sooner than he needed to and without the use of the whip. Zac Purton gets the best out of Dr Listening at Happy Valley on Wednesday night. “Well, you saw last time he should have won. Whether it was hitting the front too soon or it was the whip, he went sideways when he came to win it and there’s no doubt he should have won,” Hall said. “We didn’t know which one it was so Zac was trying to manage all those things this time, and Dr Listening was strong to the line. “I guess if there was a little question on him beforehand it was the preparation he has had in three runs for me – 1,200m, then 1,650m and now 1,800m in the space of five weeks – but that turned out the least of his worries.” Most punters were checking their racebooks when Flying Quest arrived late to win the sixth but it was a happy story in the Hall yard despite the price. “I was thinking of him more as a next season horse, he hadn’t really got his act together yet, but his last couple of runs had been OK,” Hall said. “When his owner asked if he should have a small bet on him …

North Clackamas Parks and Recreation District to Transition Services Within Happy Valley City Limits

The North Clackamas Parks and Recreation District (NCPRD) announced today that it will begin working with city of Happy Valley staff to transition park and recreation services to the city, following the city’s resolution to withdraw from the district. “NCPRD would have liked to continue serving our Happy Valley residents, but respects the city’s decision to offer those services directly,” said NCPRD Director Scott Archer. “We are proud of our record in Happy Valley and how many residents participate in our recreational programming.” “As for new park facilities,” Archer noted, “within three years of entering the district, we are pleased to have delivered on the city’s number one priority at the time – a 30-acre park with sports fields, next to a school in the Rock Creek area. Hood View Park is a tremendous community asset, widely used by Happy Valley schoolchildren and sports leagues, and will be there for generations to come.” The development of Hood View Park was the largest project in NCPRD’s history and was financed with funding from multiple agencies in addition to NCPRD and the city, including Metro, Clackamas County, and the North Clackamas School District. Through a partnership agreement between NCPRD and the school district, its sports fields are used by the school district during school days, and programmed by NCPRD after school hours, on weekends and during school breaks. In addition to the sports fields, the park includes picnic facilities, a playground, and a walking trail, all developed during the initial $18 million Phase 1. Phase 2, which was outlined in the district’s approved Capital Improvement Plan, included plans for a recreation center and other amenities. NCPRD currently maintains, or provides funding to maintain, all neighborhood parks, trails and natural areas in and around Happy Valley, including Mount Talbert Nature Park and Happy Valley Nature Park. It provides these services as part of an overall park and trail maintenance plan network offered throughout its 36-square-mile district. NCPRD also currently serves thousands of Happy Valley youth and adults with recreational and sports programming, summer camps, Movies in the Park, and other recreational programs. It also provides Happy Valley residents with in-district rates at the popular North Clackamas Aquatic Park. NCPRD and the city will work together in coming months to determine transition plans for the maintenance effort and recreational programming. Today, NCPRD serves over 122,000 district residents within the city of Milwaukie, Happy Valley, …

Family in Happy Valley

Raise Your Family in Happy Valley, Oregon

Happy Valley, Oregon is a great place to live and raise a family. There are plenty of new houses and the schools are excellent. With a low crime rate and an ideal location near Portland, there are plenty of great reasons to move to Happy Valley. Happy Valley is a suburb, and it is made up of very nice houses and small strip malls. There are lots of available houses so if you are looking to buy a home, you will find lots of houses to choose from. The housing prices are reasonable and you can get a lot of house for your money when you move there. One of the best things about moving to Happy Valley with kids is that the school system is excellent. Happy Valley is known for their great schools and you can find some amazing public schools there. The schools are nice and new and the entire feel of the area is somewhat upscale. If you want to be near the city yet not too near the city, then Happy Valley could be a good choice. Happy Valley is close to Portland, but you can quickly get away from the bustle of the city and enjoy quiet time in your neighborhood. The neighborhoods in Happy Valley are mainly home to families and you will feel right at home if you have a family to bring with you. Oregon is a beautiful place to live, with lots of water and green landscapes. The weather is good and it doesn’t really get too hot or too cold. The cost of living isn’t the cheapest, but it isn’t the most expensive either. Oregon is just a nice place to live and it is an even nice place to raise a family.

Happy Valley Wants Parks, so It’s Leaving the Parks District (Column)

In Happy Valley, city leaders have determined that if you want your parks done right, you build them yourself. The city is planning to de-annex from the North Clackamas Parks & Recreation District by the end of the year, in part because while the city has more than doubled in population – and contributed $27 million to the district – it’s gotten no new neighborhood parks in 11 years. The North Clackamas Parks & Recreation District represents more than 120,000 residents in the cities of Milwaukie, Happy Valley and surrounding unincorporated areas. It’s a service district of the county, governed by the Clackamas County Board of Commissioners. North Clackamas Parks & Rec operates an aquatic center and a senior center and manages local parks and sports leagues. Property owners within the district pay 53 cents per $1,000 of assessed value toward those services. When Happy Valley joined the parks district in 2006, the city had about 9,200 residents. Since then, it’s become one of the fastest growing cities in Oregon, with a population closer to 20,000. All that new construction has generated millions of dollars in what’s called system development charges – one-time fees assessed on developers to make sure infrastructure for things like water, sewer, roads and parks can support added growth. More people need more parks, right? For each new single family home constructed in the city, developers pay $6,075 toward parks alone. Over 11 years, Happy Valley builders have paid a total of $17.5 million in system development charges for parks, but the district has built only one new facility in the city. The 35-acre complex of Hood View Park, which opened in 2009, features all-weather turf ball fields used by youth and adult sports leagues. It’s a top-notch ballpark, but city leaders still expected more. Some $8 million in unspent system development charges were carried over into this year’s parks district budget. “That park is a beautiful park,” Mayor Lori DeRemer said. “But it’s not a community park, and it’s certainly no community center, and we all know what community centers cost. We’re no nearer to that goal than we were 12 years ago.” This alone was enough for city leaders to consider leaving the district – but the final straw came earlier this year, when the parks district announced plans to sell Hood View Park to the school district for use at a new high …