North Clackamas Parks and Recreation District to transition services within Happy Valley city limits

The North Clackamas Parks and Recreation District (NCPRD) announced today that it will begin working with city of Happy Valley staff to transition park and recreation services to the city, following the city’s resolution to withdraw from the district. "NCPRD would have liked to continue serving our Happy Valley residents, but respects the city’s decision to offer those services directly," said NCPRD Director Scott Archer. "We are proud of our record in Happy Valley and how many residents participate in our recreational programming." "As for new park facilities," Archer noted, "within three years of entering the district, we are pleased to have delivered on the city’s number one priority at the time – a 30-acre park with sports fields, next to a school in the Rock Creek area. Hood View Park is a tremendous community asset, widely used by Happy Valley schoolchildren and sports leagues, and will be there for generations to come." The development of Hood View Park was the largest project in NCPRD’s history and was financed with funding from multiple agencies in addition to NCPRD and the city, including Metro, Clackamas County, and the North Clackamas School District. Through a partnership agreement between NCPRD and the school district, its sports fields are used by the school district during school days, and programmed by NCPRD after school hours, on weekends and during school breaks. In addition to the sports fields, the park includes picnic facilities, a playground, and a walking trail, all developed during the initial $18 million Phase 1. Phase 2, which was outlined in the district’s approved Capital Improvement Plan, included plans for a recreation center and other amenities. NCPRD currently maintains, or provides funding to maintain, all neighborhood parks, trails and natural areas in and around Happy Valley, including Mount Talbert Nature Park and Happy Valley Nature Park. It provides these services as part of an overall park and trail maintenance plan network offered throughout its 36-square-mile district. NCPRD also currently serves thousands of Happy Valley youth and adults with recreational and sports programming, summer camps, Movies in the Park, and other recreational programs. It also provides Happy Valley residents with in-district rates at the popular North Clackamas Aquatic Park. NCPRD and the city will work together in coming months to determine transition plans for the maintenance effort and recreational programming. Today, NCPRD serves over 122,000 district residents within the city of Milwaukie, Happy Valley, …

Raise Your Family In Happy Valley, Oregon

Happy Valley, Oregon is a great place to live and raise a family. There are plenty of new houses and the schools are excellent. With a low crime rate and an ideal location near Portland, there are plenty of great reasons to move to Happy Valley. Happy Valley is a suburb, and it is made up of very nice houses and small strip malls. There are lots of available houses so if you are looking to buy a home, you will find lots of houses to choose from. The housing prices are reasonable and you can get a lot of house for your money when you move there. One of the best things about moving to Happy Valley with kids is that the school system is excellent. Happy Valley is known for their great schools and you can find some amazing public schools there. The schools are nice and new and the entire feel of the area is somewhat upscale. If you want to be near the city yet not too near the city, then Happy Valley could be a good choice. Happy Valley is close to Portland, but you can quickly get away from the bustle of the city and enjoy quiet time in your neighborhood. The neighborhoods in Happy Valley are mainly home to families and you will feel right at home if you have a family to bring with you. Oregon is a beautiful place to live, with lots of water and green landscapes. The weather is good and it doesn’t really get too hot or too cold. The cost of living isn’t the cheapest, but it isn’t the most expensive either. Oregon is just a nice place to live and it is an even nice place to raise a family.

Happy Valley wants parks, so it’s leaving the parks district (Column)

In Happy Valley, city leaders have determined that if you want your parks done right, you build them yourself. The city is planning to de-annex from the North Clackamas Parks & Recreation District by the end of the year, in part because while the city has more than doubled in population – and contributed $27 million to the district – it’s gotten no new neighborhood parks in 11 years. The North Clackamas Parks & Recreation District represents more than 120,000 residents in the cities of Milwaukie, Happy Valley and surrounding unincorporated areas. It’s a service district of the county, governed by the Clackamas County Board of Commissioners. North Clackamas Parks & Rec operates an aquatic center and a senior center and manages local parks and sports leagues. Property owners within the district pay 53 cents per $1,000 of assessed value toward those services. When Happy Valley joined the parks district in 2006, the city had about 9,200 residents. Since then, it’s become one of the fastest growing cities in Oregon, with a population closer to 20,000. All that new construction has generated millions of dollars in what’s called system development charges – one-time fees assessed on developers to make sure infrastructure for things like water, sewer, roads and parks can support added growth. More people need more parks, right? For each new single family home constructed in the city, developers pay $6,075 toward parks alone. Over 11 years, Happy Valley builders have paid a total of $17.5 million in system development charges for parks, but the district has built only one new facility in the city. The 35-acre complex of Hood View Park, which opened in 2009, features all-weather turf ball fields used by youth and adult sports leagues. It’s a top-notch ballpark, but city leaders still expected more. Some $8 million in unspent system development charges were carried over into this year’s parks district budget. "That park is a beautiful park," Mayor Lori DeRemer said. "But it’s not a community park, and it’s certainly no community center, and we all know what community centers cost. We’re no nearer to that goal than we were 12 years ago." This alone was enough for city leaders to consider leaving the district – but the final straw came earlier this year, when the parks district announced plans to sell Hood View Park to the school district for use at a new high …